5 wacky health trends that have gone viral


When it comes to health and wellness, trends can get strange. 

Many wacky wellness trends gain popularity when celebrities endorse them.  

When it comes to health trends, you should always be mindful of your own body. 

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Even if a certain method works wonders for someone else, it may not provide the same results for you. 

One strange health trend is applying toothpaste to pimples. This is one that doesn’t hold much truth.   (iStock)

Below are five untraditional health trends that are still popular today. 

  1. Oil pulling
  2. Cupping
  3. Using toothpaste for curing acne
  4. Eating placenta
  5. Taking the cold plunge

1. Oil pulling 

Oil pulling is the practice of swishing oil — such as sesame oil or coconut oil — around the mouth, similar to how you would with mouthwash, for several minutes. 

Many have given this method a try to kill harmful bacteria in the mouth and reduce bad breath, according to Medical News Today. The outlet notes that teeth whitening, a common reason many try oil pulling, is not a benefit that research can support. 

One of the biggest things to overcome with oil pulling is the texture of the oil and the length of time you need to swish it around your mouth. 

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It’s recommended by many sources to do this for 15-20 minutes every day.

2. Cupping

Cupping therapy is when cups are placed on the skin to create a suction, with potential benefits of improving blood flow, boosting immune function, removing toxins and reducing pain, according to Healthline. 

Although cupping looks painful, with skin reddening underneath each cup, many think of it as a form of massage. 

Michael Phelps swimming

Michael Phelps took advantage of cupping during the Olympic Games.  (Amin Mohammad Jamali/Getty Images)

Celebrities including Lady Gaga, Lena Dunham and Michael Phelps have jumped on the cupping bandwagon.

Be mindful of when you get cupping done. 

Try to avoid doing it before a big event because it will leave marks. 

3. Using toothpaste for curing acne

Some celebrities, including Kendall Jenner and Jennifer Love Hewitt, have tried an old teenage trick of using toothpaste to clear up a pimple.

It may cause more harm than good. Putting toothpaste on a pimple is essentially going to dry it up.

It could end up leaving the skin red and irritated, making the pimple worse than before you applied the toothpaste, according to Verywell Health. 

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So, it’s probably best to leave the toothpaste on the toothbrush and off your pesky pimples. 

4. Eating placenta 

After childbirth, some moms consume the placenta for health benefits, such as preventing postpartum depression and reducing bleeding, according to the Mayo Clinic. 

That said, a number of sources, including WebMD, note that the many positive claims that come with eating a placenta haven’t been fully tested, so there is no proof about the claims. 

5. Taking the cold plunge 

If you have any form of social media, you have most likely seen someone dunk themselves into a frigid tub of water in the middle of winter. 

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Many who do the cold plunge take it seriously and submerge themselves in frigid water, no matter how chilly the air is around them. 

Shovel filled with ice

Forget cold showers. Many have taken it to the next level with a cold plunge.  (Kerem Yucel/AFP via Getty Images)

Cold plunging can be done in the wilderness or at home with an outdoor tub. 

Starting out with an at-home tub isn’t a bad idea, as it’s a more controlled environment. 

If you are going to give this trend a go, you don’t have to be in the water for too long. You actually shouldn’t be, with frostbite and hypothermia as potential risks. 

The Mayo Clinic Health System notes that most people start out with just 30 seconds in the water and work their way up to five to 10 minutes at a time. 

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There haven’t been many studies done of cold plunging, but increased mood, sport recovery and decreased feelings of stress have been commonly noted as potential benefits. 

It’s best to check with your doctor or health care provider before you undertake this. 

Stephanie Bucklin contributed reporting. 

For more Lifestyle articles, visit www.foxnews.com/lifestyle.



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